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2014 National Book Award: The Longlists


The titles long listed for the National Book Awards have been trickling in this week and today the final category, Fiction, was announced.  Some of the titles that have appeared on our Best Books of the Month lists are included but we'll have to wait until October 15th to see which books make the list of finalists.  We usually do a pool in the office with our predictions for the winners in each category--last year our Director, Sara Nelson, was the most prescient.  Do you have any thoughts about who should take home the National Book Awards this year?

How I Wrote It: Lin Enger, on "The High Divide"


Set in the 1880s in the northern plains of Minnesota and Montana, Lin Enger's second novel, The High Divide, tells the sweeping story of of a man on the run, from both his family and his past.

The Gray Areas of Gray Matter: Author Matt Richtel on Information Overload


In 2006, a pair of rocket scientists died on a Utah highway, killed in a collision with a student named Reggie Shaw, who had been texting at the time of the accident.

Portrait of "The City": San Francisco, 1940-1960


As a fourth-generation San Franciscan, few are as familiar with the City by the Bay as photographer Fred Lyon.

No One Is Alone: Affirmations for Life Change


Lifelong friends, screenwriter Tracey Jackson and musician Paul ("Evergreen") Williams have a lot in common: great wit, great talent, and a gift for friendship.

How I Wrote It: Ian Buruma, on Art and Drama, Violence and Cruelty


As an author and a contributor to The New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, Ian Buruma has repeatedly returned to topics that ceaselessly fascinate him: war, violence, art, religion, often all at once.

The Best Books of September: Some Old Friends and Some Surprises New


September’s Best Books of the Month are out, and featured among our Top 10 picks is the #1 book on Amazon right now (the title may be a surprise to some).

Exclusive: Senator John McCain Reviews Bill O'Reilly's "Killing Patton"


Through their series of best-selling books--including Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot and Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever--Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard have revisited the sudden, unexpected deaths of several of history's most significant figures, and how the those terrible events echoed across time and the world.

From the Archives: Bigfoot vs. Nessie? No Contest, Says Sasquatch Expert


As I was searching through the Omniovoracious archives yesterday for stories about David Foster Wallace (who died on Sept.

Graphic Novel Friday: Summer Fantasy


Last time on GNF, we covered our favorite summer science fiction reads. This week, let’s talk fantasy.

From the Archives: Remembering David Foster Wallace


David Foster Wallace died on this date in 2008 at the age of 46. The novelist, short story writer, and essayist left behind some of the most widely admired American fiction of the past fifty years, particularly his 1996 novel, the brilliant and bewildering Infinite Jest.

Work Worth Doing: "The Roosevelts: An Intimate History"


For more than 30 years, through an impressive collection of highly acclaimed, long-form documentary films, Ken Burns has established himself as one of the premier chroniclers of American history.

Runway Roundup: New Releases for Fashion Week


I think I’ve probably used up all the words allotted for praising I’ll Drink to That, the new memoir from the octogenarian style maven, Betty Halbreich.

Jennifer Holm and Esther Ehrlich: Best Books of September


Two of my favorite kids' books this month (both on our Best Children's Books of September list) are Jennifer Holm's The Fourteenth Goldfish and Esther Ehrlich's Nest.  They are very different stories, but have strong family relationships and spunky main characters in common--I think the same reader would really enjoy both.

Karen Russell talks with Bradford Morrow about his new novel "The Forgers"


Bradford Morrow's The Forgers is a dark literary thriller set inside the world of rare books. The incomparable Karen Russell is a big fan of The Forgers and caught up with Morrow to talk to him about his forthcoming book.  ------------------------------------------------------------- KAREN RUSSELL: The Forgers is a totally sui generis existential thriller that introduced me to the world of rare book collecting, a world where I know you have serious street cred.

How I Wrote It: Debut Author Michael Pitre, on "Fives and Twenty-Fives"


In early 2011, Michael Pitre found himself transfixed by the Arab Spring protests flaring throughout Northern Africa and the Middle East.

Recipe Road Test: Best Guacamole EVER


Good guacamole can be the entire reason for going to a particular restaurant, but there is also a lot of mediocre guac out there--especially at my house...  I've tried the package of guacamole seasoning from the grocery store.

How I Wrote It: James Ellroy, on WWII and His Second LA Quartet


The “enormity” of December 7, 1941 still resonates for James Ellroy. It's an event that rippled through his home city of Los Angeles and is now at the core of his new novel, which uses the Pearl Harbor bombing as the trigger point for a cascading series of interconnected lives and storylines, exploring politics, race, sex, corruption and more.

Karen Russell talks with Bradford Morrow about his new novel "The Forgers"


Bradford Morrow's The Forgers is a dark literary thriller set inside the world of rare books. The incomparable Karen Russell is a big fan of The Forgers and caught up with Morrow to ask him some questions.

XKCD Webcomic Creator Randall Munroe Asks: "What If?"


What if I swam in a pool of spent nuclear fuel? What would happen if lightning struck a bullet in midair?


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