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The Immovable Ladder of Jerusalem’s Church of The Holy Sepulchre


Underneath one of the arched windows of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, in the Old City of Jerusalem, there is an old wooden ladder casually leaning against the wall on the upper ledge.

The Ships Buried Under San Francisco’s Streets


Beneath the streets of San Francisco’s financial district lie the remains of dozens of sailing ships that once brought people to San Francisco during the gold rush of the mid-19th century.

Fermont’s Inhabitable Wind Break


The town of Fermont, situated near the Quebec-Labrador border, is a Canadian mining town. It was founded in the early 1970s by the Québec Cartier Mining Company to exploit the vast deposits of iron ore on Mont Wright, located about 25 kilometers to the west from the town site.

Why is Water Pouring Out of This Tree in Montenegro?

The Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty recently shared a video about a unique natural phenomenon in a village called Dinoša, located in southeastern Montenegro—a small country on the Adriatic coast.

Alexander Fleming’s Microbial Art


Alexander Fleming is widely known as the brilliant microbiologist who gave the world the miraculous life-saving drug called antibiotic.

Rat Kings: The Mysterious Conjoined Creature


On a cold January morning in 2005, in the village of Saru in southern Estonia, farmer Rein Kıiv and his son made a curious discovery.

The Rocks That Give Birth


In the Freita mountain range in northern Portugal, close to a village called Castanheira, is a huge block of granite that periodically ejects small pebble-sized stones.

The Seaweed Houses of Læsø Island


On the island of Læsø, located off the coast of Denmark, there are houses with roofs made of seaweed.

Why Are These Postage Stamps Cut in Half?


Would you cut a ten dollar bill in half and use as two five dollar bills? Of course not. It's silly to even suggest something like that.

The Building That Was Mailed Through The Post


The inauguration of domestic parcel post service by the United States Postal Office in 1913 was an epochal event in the lives of thousands of Americans, especially those residing in far-flung areas of the country.

Vinegar Valentines: The Victorian Tradition of Sending Anonymous Hate Mail


In the late 19th century, Valentine's Day was more than an occasion for lovers to express their love for each other by sending greetings cards and presenting gifts.

The Basement Cemetery of The New Haven Green Church


The New Haven Green in downtown New Haven, a city in Connecticut, USA, is a small park of about 16 acres.

Rainbow Colored Mountains


Soil is typically brown, but when mixed with the right minerals in right quantities, it can yield a fascinating range of colors.

The Magnificent Mudbrick Mosques of West Africa


All around the Muslim world, mosques have a typical architecture characterized by a minaret, a dome, arches and mosaics or stucco decorations.

Priest Holes: Secret Chambers That Hid Mediaeval Priests


In mediaeval England, when feuds were violent and justice swift and brutal, it was common for castles and mansions of the powerful and the wealthy to have secret chambers or hidden passageways that allowed the owners to hide or escape from pursuers in the event of a surprise attack.

Yaodong: China’s Pit Houses


For more than four thousand years, on the Loess Plateau in northern China, people have been residing in caves known as yaodong, which is Chinese for “house cave”.

Women Who Become Men: The Sworn Virgins of Albania


In the remote mountains of northern Albania are villages where there are women who live and act like men.

Rainbow Colored Mountains


Soil is typically brown, but when mixed with the right minerals in right quantities, it can yield a fascinating range of colors.

Fore-edge Painting: Hidden Artworks on The Edges of Books

The following video created by an archivist at Cornell University’s Library, New York, shows a 1925 copy of Rudyard Kipling's "Kim".

The House That Was Moved Across The Atlantic


Sometimes a house just needs to be moved no matter what’s the cost. Usually, these are historic structures that are in danger of demolition or flooding and has to be relocated to a safer spot.


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