All Your Web In One Place.

Everything you want to read - news, your favorite blogs, art and more - in one convenient place designed for you.

Learn more about MultiPLX or signup for personalized experience.


How to Do Nothing with Nobody All Alone by Yourself: A Timely Vintage Field Guide to Self-Reliant Play and Joyful Solitude


A celebration of makers and hackers from half a century before they were called makers and hackers. Legendary psychoanalyst Adam Phillips has written beautifully about why the capacity for boredom is essential for a full life and Susan Sontag contemplated the creative purpose of boredom.

Mark Twain on Slavery, How Religion Is Used to Justify Injustice, and What His Mother Taught Him About Compassion


“She never used large words, but she had a natural gift for making small ones do effective work.” Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, is celebrated as America’s greatest humorist — from his irreverent advice to little girls to his snarky stance on creativity to his masterwork on masturbation.

How to Do Nothing with Nobody All Alone by Yourself: A Timely Vintage Field Guide to Self-Reliant Play and Joyful Solitude


A celebration of makers and hackers from half a century before they were called makers and hackers. Legendary psychoanalyst Adam Phillips has written beautifully about why the capacity for boredom is essential for a full life and Susan Sontag contemplated the creative purpose of boredom.

What Is Philosophy For? A Beautiful Animated Manifesto for Undoing Our Unwisdom, Cultivating Our Character, and Gaining Perspective


“The points at which our unwisdom bites and messes up our lives are multiple and urgently need attention, right now.” “Philosophy’s main task is to respond to the soul’s cry,” Sharon Lebell wrote in her classical manual for the art of living.

Once Upon an Alphabet: Oliver Jeffers’s Imaginative Illustrated Stories for the Letters


A warm and wonderful celebration of the paradoxes and perplexities that make us human. In the 1990s, three decades after the debut of his now-iconic grim alphabet book, the great Edward Gorey reimagined the letters in a series of 26-word cryptic stories.

A Wave in the Mind: Virginia Woolf on Emotion and Writing


“A sight, an emotion, creates this wave in the mind, long before it makes words to fit it.” “A crisp sentence, an arresting metaphor, a witty aside, an elegant turn of phrase,” Harvard psycholinguist Steven Pinker wrote in his wonderful modern guide to style, “are among life’s greatest pleasures.” A century and a half earlier, Schopenhauer proclaimed that “style is the physiognomy of the mind.” Undoubtedly one of humanity’s most beautiful minds and greatest masters of elegant, pleasurable language is Virginia Woolf — a mastery that unfolded with equal enchantment in her public writings as well as her private, as both sprang from the same source of passion and perspicacity.

The Most Generous Book in the World: An Illustrated Celebration of the Little-Known Sidekicks Behind Creative Geniuses


A heartening homage to the wives, mothers, brothers, benefactors, and other quiet champions behind some of history’s most celebrated geniuses.

October 22, 1964: Jean-Paul Sartre Becomes the First Person to Decline the Nobel Prize


“A writer who adopts political, social, or literary positions must act only with the means that are his own — that is, the written word.” Despite its surprisingly dark origin, the Nobel Prize is regarded as the highest honor bestowed upon a human being.

You Have Never Seen the Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe on the Shimmering Beauty of the Southwest


“There is something wonderful about the bigness and the lonelyness and the windyness of it all.” When Georgia O’Keeffe (November 15, 1887–March 6, 1986) was a little girl, decades before she came to be regarded as America’s first great female artist and became the first woman honored with a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, her other used to read to her history and travel stories every night before bed.

Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark on Trust, Integrity, Human Nature, and Why a Steady Moral Compass Is the Best Investment


“What surprises me, in a way, is how almost universally people are trustworthy and good.” In 2007, Y Combinator founding partner Jessica Livingston set out “to establish a fund of experience that everyone can learn from” by interviewing some of the most successful entrepreneurs at the time — the founders and first employees of such celebrated companies as Apple, PayPal, Flickr, Adobe, and Firefox.

My Favorite Things: Maira Kalman’s Illustrated Catalog of Unusual Objects, Memories, and Delight


“Go out and walk. That is the glory of life.” Four decades after Barthes listed his favorite things, which prompted Susan Sontag to list hers, Maira Kalman — one of the most enchanting, influential, and unusual creative voices today, and a woman of piercing insight — does something very similar and very different in her magnificent book My Favorite Things (public library).

Happy Birthday, Ursula Le Guin: Dogs, Cats, and the Human Burdens of Beauty


“There are a whole lot of ways to be perfect, and not one of them is attained through punishment.” “A Dog is, on the whole, what you would call a simple soul,” T.S.

Happy Birthday, Ursula Le Guin: Dogs, Cats, and the Human Burdens of Beauty


“There are a whole lot of ways to be perfect, and not one of them is attained through punishment.” “A Dog is, on the whole, what you would call a simple soul,” T.S.

The Hummingbird Effect: How Galileo Invented Time and Gave Rise to the Modern Tyranny of the Clock


How the invisible hand of the clock powered the Industrial Revolution and sparked the Information Age.

Mister Horizontal & Miss Vertical: A Minimalist Picture-Book about How We Become Who We Are


A brilliant conceptual graphic story about how we get our stripes of character and identity. It is said that “who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love.” But it depends perhaps even more on who loved each other before they came to love us — parenting shapes not only our psychological constitution, from our capacity for fertile solitude to our relationship with achievement, but perhaps most palpably our physical.

Happy Birthday, John Dewey: On War, the Future of Pacifism, and Our Individual Role in Peace


“The present task of the constructive pacifist is to call attention away from the catchwords which so easily in wartime become the substitute for both facts and ideas back to realities.” Philosopher, psychologist, and education reformer John Dewey (October 20, 1859–June 1, 1952) is one of the most influential minds of the twentieth century.

Ursula K. Le Guin on Being a Man


A journey to where the semicolon meets the soul. Who are we when we, to borrow Hannah Arendt’s enduring words, “are together with no one but ourselves”?

A Stocking for a Kitten: Beautiful Vintage Children’s Book Illustrations of Domestic Life in Eastern Europe


Entitlement, empathy, and ethics, with a large helping of grandmotherly love. Every summer during my childhood, my parents would ship me off to my maternal grandmother in rural Bulgaria — a land of colorful rugs and handcrafted pottery and grandmothers constantly knitting mittens and stockings and scarves.

Are Writers Born or Made? Jack Kerouac on the Crucial Difference Between Talent and Genius


“Genius gives birth, talent delivers.” “All of us, we’re links in a chain,” Pete Seeger observed in pondering the nature of creative work.

Happy Birthday, Oscar Wilde: A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated


“Public opinion exists only where there are no ideas.” Oscar Wilde (October 16, 1854–November 30, 1900) was not only the twentieth century’s first pop-culture celebrity, but also arguably the most tragic one — at the height of his literary celebrity, his strong opinions and the socially unacceptable romance behind his exquisite love letters led to a protracted series of trials, the last of which landed Wilde in prison to serve two years of “hard labor” for charges of libel and “gross indecency.” During the trials, Defense Attorney Edward Carson cross-examined 41-year-old Wilde (who, in making a characteristically Wildean complete mockery of the testimony, stated that he was 39 but had “no wish to pose as being young”) about two of his most controversial public texts, particularly a short collection of maxims and aphorisms titled “A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated” — the origin of the famous Wilde remark that Steven Pinker quoted in his excellent modern guide to elegant writing.


Loading...