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Your life on Earth


The BBC has a fun piece that shows changes over your lifetime. Enter your date of birth, gender, and height, and you get personalized data nuggets, categorized by how you changed, how the world changed, and how people changed the world during your years on this planet.

A healthy versus unhealthy office environment


In an interesting use of the before-and-after slider, this Washington Post graphic by Bonnie Berkowitz and Laura Stanton contrasts an unhealthy office environment against a healthy one.

Data Fluency, Coming Soon


There's a new addition to the FlowingData book series on the way. It's called Data Fluency: Empowering Your Organization With Effective Data Communication.

Map of book subjects on Internet Archive


The Internet Archive makes millions of digitized books available in the form of scanned pages, and these books are categorized into thousands of subjects.

How basketball rebounds work


Kirk Goldsberry, with help from Andy Woodruff, looked at how rebounds work in the NBA from a statistical perspective.

Equal population mapper


We know that there are more people per square mile in some places than others, but it can be a challenge to understand the magnitude of the differences.

Road grid orientation in major cities


This is what you get when you group streets by their geographic orientation and color them accordingly with a neon paintbrush.

Linked Small Multiples


Small multiples are great, and the right interactions can make them even better. Continue reading →

Geographic smell maps


Kate McLean, a PhD candidate in Information Experience Design at the Royal College of Art, is interested in the senses.

10,000 League of Legends matches, all at once


League of Legends is an online, free-to-play game that pits two teams of five against each other. The goal is to destroy the other team's structures.

Fallacy of point-and-click analysis

Jeff Leek touches on concerns about point-and-click software to find the insights in your data, magically and with little to no effort.

Ebola spreading, a simulation


As a way to understand the deadliness and spread of Ebola, the Washington Post runs a simplified simulation of how long it's likely to take for the virus to infect 100 unvaccinated people.

Skateboard physics


Aatish Bhatia, a recent physics PhD, describes the forces involved to do a skateboard Ollie. It's all about managing your center of gravity and applying variable amounts of torque to steer the board in the air.

Interracial and same-sex marriage parallels


xkcd doing what xkcd does. Randall Munroe charts a brief timeline of interracial and same-sex marriage, through the lens of popular approval and population.

Tracking the ad industry


We browse online, we see ads, and we buy stuff. The better-targeted the ads are, the more likely that we buy stuff.

Why to pursue a PhD

Philip Guo provides three practical reasons on why it's worth pursuing a PhD. Worth considering if you're hemming and hawing about graduate school.

Deviations from the mean


As a way to bring context to the rarity of the 18-inning baseball game between the Washington Nationals and the San Francisco Giants this past weekend, Ross Benes compared other things that are 9.1 standard deviations from the mean, such as an NBA team losing by 83 points and having a 13.4-inch penis.

Real cities drawn as fantasy maps


Remember that time you were sitting by the fire reading The Lord of the Rings and thought to yourself, "Gee golly.

Ditch Excel and format your data with csvkit

I thought I linked to csvkit a while ago, but apparently not. If you deal with CSV data at all, you should know about the utilities suite that helps you format and re-format in various ways.

Big chicken


From Vox and research from Zuidhof et al., chickens are quite big these days. The one on the left is a breed from 1957.


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