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Fun Fact: Chameleon Bones Glow in the Dark

Shine an ultraviolet light on a chameleon in the dark, and it will light up with an eerie blue glow. It's not their color-changing skin at play here, either.

The Pain-Relieving Power of a Loving Touch

Around 100 million adults in the United States are affected by chronic pain – pain that lasts for months or years on end.

How Mantis Shrimp Punch So Hard Without Hurting Themselves

Oftentimes, throwing a punch at something (or someone) ends up hurting the hand behind it more than anything else. Bruised skin, sore knuckles and even cracked wrists can result from an ill-fated punch, and that's just with human-level strength.

A Black Hole 'Double Burps'

Supermassive black holes reside at the center of most, if not all, massive (and possibly low-mass) galaxies.

Fart-Sniffing Pill Reveals Secrets of the Gut

Your nose, mouth, skin pores and…other…body holes each serve their unique functions. But most of them also double as biological exhaust pipes, spewing gaseous byproducts of the myriad internal chemical reactions keeping you alive.

Suppressing a Sneeze Could Rupture Your Throat

Attempting to contain a sneeze could be a recipe for disaster. A 34-year-old patient visited a hospital in the United Kingdom complaining of an extremely sore throat and a dramatic voice change after attempting to suppress a sneeze by pinching his nose and closing his mouth.

Surfers Three Times More Likely to Harbor Dangerous Bacteria

British surfers are coming back from the beach with more than good vibes. A study from University of Exeter researchers found the surfers had levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that were three times higher than those who didn't hang ten.

Google App Matches Your Face With Famous Art

People are matching their faces with famous art — and some of the results are hilarious. They’re using the Google Arts & Culture app, which uses image recognition to scour art collections from more than 1,200 museums, galleries and institutions across the world.

Machines Best Humans in Stanford's Grueling Reading Test

The ability to read and understand a passage of text underpins the pursuit of knowledge, and was once a uniquely human cognitive activity.

Make a List; Fall Asleep Faster

About 40 percent of Americans have problems falling asleep and they spend billions every year on sleep aids and remedies.

Your Weekly Attenborough: Nepenthes attenboroughii

Oh, to be a pitcher plant. Unlike most of the animal kingdom, who run around chasing money, antelopes, Twitter mentions and whatnot, pitcher plants just sit there and let it all come to them.

The Wall of Westeros Would Be Its Own Worst Enemy

The Wall that defends the Game of Thrones universe would need to be made of more than pure ice if it had stood for over 8,000 years.

Massive Deposits of Water Ice Found on Mars

Despite the fact that Mars has an atmosphere just 1 percent as dense as Earth’s, the surface of the Red Planet still has to deal with plenty of weathering and erosion.

An 'Internal Scale' Could Regulate Weight Loss In Humans

Losing weight may not be that hard — for rodents, a new study shows. Researchers have discovered an internal scale in rats and mice that sends signals to the brain to cut back on food if weight gain is detected.

Japanese Astronaut Grew In Space, But Not THAT Much

A Japanese astronaut grew three and a half inches during the course of his trip to the International Space Station.

Robotic Implants Could Help Remedy a Rare Birth Defect

Robots are finding new ways to get under our skin, and that’s a good thing. Lab-grown organs are carving their place in medicine, as scientists can today grow miniature brains, kidneys and more in the lab to conduct research or even treat patients.

The Extreme Origins of a Fast Radio Burst

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the few truly mysterious phenomena in the universe. Astronomers first noticed the milliseconds-long intense pulses of radio waves in 2006, and we’ve slowly but steadily been learning more about the extragalactic signals ever since.

Butterflies and Moths May Have Predated Flowers

Think of some scaly animals. Odds are butterflies didn’t come to mind. But butterflies and moths have scales on their wings, legs and bodies.

It's So Cold, You Might Be Allergic to It

On a freezing morning in January, my boyfriend had just emerged from the icy waters of Lake Michigan along with hundreds of others who had just participated in the annual Polar Plunge.

Astronauts Are Hotter in Space

A great amount of time and effort is spent ensuring the mental and physical well-being of astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS), and new research shows that increased body temperature is another factor to consider when evaluating astronauts’ health.


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