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How Long Can a Rocky World Withstand the Blasts From a Red Dwarf Star?


Red dwarf stars have become a major focal point for exoplanet studies lately, and for good reason. For starters, M-type (red dwarf) stars are the most common type in our Universe, accounting for 75% of stars in the Milky Way alone.

Gaia Looks Beyond our Galaxy to Other Islands of Stars


The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Gaia mission is an ambitious project. Having launched in December of 2013, the purpose of this space observatory has been to measure the position and distances of 1 billion objects – including stars, extra-solar planets, comets, asteroids and even quasars.

Are Little Blue Dots in the Hubble Frontier Fields Precursors to Globular Clusters?


In 2012, the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program (aka. Hubble Deep Fields Initiative 2012) officially kicked off.

NASA’s Opportunity Rover Withstands Another Harsh Winter on Mars


When the Opportunity rover landed on Mars on January 25th, 2004, its mission was only meant to last for about 90 Earth days.

Meteors Explode from the Inside When They Reach the Atmosphere


Earth is no stranger to meteors. In fact, meteor showers are a regular occurrence, where small objects (meteoroids) enter the Earth’s atmosphere and radiate in the night sky.

86 Stars Just got Official Names from the IAU


When we think of the most commonly-known stars in the night sky, what springs to mind? Chances are, it would be stars like Sirius, Vega, Deneb, Rigel, Betelgeuse, Polaris, and Arcturus – all of which derive their names from Arabic, Greek or Latin origins.

What is the Perfect Gift for Every Space Enthusiast? The Year in Space Calendar 2018!


What is the most wonderful time of the year? In my opinion, it is when the new Year In Space Calendars come out!

Carnival of Space #539

This week’s Carnival of Space is hosted by Brian Wang at his Next Big Future blog. Click here to read Carnival of Space #539 And if you’re interested in looking back, here’s an archive to all the past Carnivals of Space.

Weekly Space Hangout – Dec 13, 2017: Emilio Enriquez and SETI’s Breakthrough Listen Initiative

Hosts: Fraser Cain (universetoday.com / @fcain) Dr. Paul M. Sutter (pmsutter.com / @PaulMattSutter) Dr.

New Map Shows the Motion of all the Galaxies in Our Supercluster


For almost a century, astronomers have understood that the Universe is in a state of expansion. This is a consequence of General Relativity, and the rate at which it is expanding is known as the Hubble Constant – named after the man who first noticed the phenomena.

Breakthrough Listen is Going to Scan ‘Oumuamua, You Know, Just to be Sure it’s Just an Asteroid and Not a Spaceship.


On October 19th, 2017, the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1) in Hawaii announced the first-ever detection of an interstellar asteroid, named 1I/2017 U1 (aka.

Messier 63 – the Sunflower Galaxy


Welcome back to Messier Monday! Today, we continue in our tribute to our dear friend, Tammy Plotner, by looking at the “Sunflower Galaxy”, otherwise known as Messier 63.

Too Big, Too Soon. Monster Black Hole Seen Shortly After the Big Bang


It is a well known fact among astronomers and cosmologists that the farther into the Universe you look, the further back in time you are seeing.

Earth and Venus are the Same Size, so Why Doesn’t Venus Have a Magnetosphere? Maybe it Didn’t Get Smashed Hard Enough


For many reasons, Venus is sometimes referred to as “Earth’s Twin” (or “Sister Planet”, depending on who you ask).

Astronauts in Trouble Will be Able to Press the “Take Me Home” Button


Living and working in space for extended periods of time is hard work. Not only do the effects of weightless take a physical toll, but conducting spacewalks is a challenge in itself.

The Space Station is Getting a New Gadget to Detect Space Debris


Since the 1960s, NASA and other space agencies have been sending more and more stuff into orbit. Between the spent stages of rockets, spent boosters, and satellites that have since become inactive, there’s been no shortage of artificial objects floating up there.

Weekly Space Hangout – Dec. 6, 2017: Brian Koberlein and “Big Science”

Hosts: Fraser Cain (universetoday.com / @fcain) Dr. Paul M. Sutter (pmsutter.com / @PaulMattSutter) Dr.

Two new Super-Earths Discovered Around a Red Dwarf Star


The search for extra-solar planets has turned up some very interesting discoveries. Aside planets that are more-massive versions of their Solar counterparts (aka.

What is the Transit Method?


For centuries, astronomers have speculated about the existence of planets beyond our Solar System. After all, with between 100 and 400 billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy alone, it seemed unlikely that ours was the only one to have a system of planets.

Messier 62 – the NGC 6266 Globular Cluster


Welcome back to Messier Monday! Today, we continue in our tribute to our dear friend, Tammy Plotner, by looking at the globular cluster known as Messier 62.


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