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Crucial Steps Ahead for Flying Cars

Flying cars are up against a wall — literally. Turning aircraft into street-safe machines requires manufacturers to prove their safety standards in crash tests.

What's Going On With the World's Most Destructive Mud Volcano?

The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting.

What Would It Take to Wipe Out All Life on Earth?

The first exoplanet was spotted in 1988. Since then more than 3,000 planets have been found outside our solar system, and it’s thought that around 20 percent of Sun-like stars have an Earth-like planet in their habitable zones.

Can Breathing Like Wim Hof Make Us Superhuman?

Take a deep breath. Feel the wave of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide press against the bounds of your ribcage and swell your lungs.

Memory Repression: A Dubious Theory That's Sticking Around

Compared to the other generational tragedies of the late '80s and early '90s, the rise of memory repression cases is hardly remembered.

Designing a Safer Explosive

This Fourth of July, as you and your family settle on a sandy beach or grassy lawn to watch a fireworks display, you’re probably not thinking about the science behind the explosives you’re witnessing.

Will Robots Rule Finance?

The year is 2030. You’re in a business school lecture hall, where just a handful of students are attending a finance class.

When Did People Start Using Money?

Sometimes you run across a grimy, tattered dollar bill that seems like it’s been around since the beginning of time.

Creating a Universe in the Lab? The Idea Is No Joke

Physicists aren’t often reprimanded for using risqué humor in their academic writings, but in 1991 that is exactly what happened to the cosmologist Andrei Linde at Stanford University.

For Funding, Scientists Turn to Unorthodox Sources

When Donna Riordan first moved to the idyllic Orcas Island just off the coast of Washington state, she had no plans of doing any sort of research, despite her background in science and education policy.

Meet Dean Lomax, Master of the Prehistoric 'Death March'

Paleontologists study creatures that have long ceased to be, all in the hopes of "resurrecting" the history of their lives on Earth.

The Mother of All Apples Is Disappearing

In the wilds of Kazakhstan, there’s an unassuming tree that bears an unassuming fruit. Like many plant species, development encroaches on its usual territory while climate change makes it harder for the tree to thrive and bear healthy yields of fruit.

The 4 Big Discoveries Underpinning Our Knowledge of the Universe

For many, science is nothing more than that class you were required to take in school. However, whether you realize it or not, science is all around us, and it impacts every aspect of our lives.

The Dark Side of Laughter

When you hear someone laugh behind you, you probably picture them on the phone or with a friend – smiling and experiencing a warm, fuzzy feeling inside.

Malaria During Pregnancy Could Bolster Babies' Immunity

You have a bit of your mother in you, literally. When scientists performed biopsies of young adults’ organs, they’ve found maternal cells embedded in hearts, kidneys, and liver.

How the Chemicals in Sunscreen Protect Our Skin

Kerry Hanson, University of California, Riverside Not so long ago, people like my Aunt Muriel thought of sunburn as a necessary evil on the way to a “good base tan.” She used to slather on the baby oil while using a large reflector to bake away.

Emerging Editing Technologies Obscure the Line Between Real and Fake

The image is modest, belying the historic import of the moment. A woman on a white sand beach gazes at a distant island as waves lap at her feet — the scene is titled simply "Jennifer in Paradise." This picture, snapped by an Industrial Light and Magic employee named John Knoll while on vacation in 1987, would become the first image to be scanned and digitally altered.

Are We Ready for Robot Judges?

Artificial intelligence is already helping determine your future – whether it’s your Netflix viewing preferences, your suitability for a mortgage or your compatibility with a prospective employer.

Can Math Can Save You From the Slow Line?

It seems obvious. You arrive at the checkouts and see one line is much longer than the other, so you join the shorter one.

Is Technology Too Good for an Old-School Test of Einstein’s Relativity?

On Aug. 21, sky-gazers from around the world will converge in the United States as a total solar eclipse charts a path from Oregon to South Carolina.


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