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Just-in-Case Informatics


[Image: A screen grab from the homepage of Orbital Insight]. Proving that some market somewhere will at least try to find a value in anything, a company called Orbital Insight is now tracking "the shadows cast by half-finished Chinese buildings" as a possible indicator for where the country's economy might be headed.

Art Arm


[Image: "Untitled #13," from "Scripted Movement Drawing Series 1" (2014) by Andrew Kudless]. San Francisco-based designer and architect Andrew Kudless is always up to something interesting, and one of his most recent projects is no exception.

Etch a Sketch


[Image: Laser-etched wood panel, design by Kris Davidson, etching by Clear Cut Creation]. This laser-etched wood panel designed by tattoo artist Kris Davidson is pretty awesome.

Tales of the Crash: An Interview with Nick Arvin


Screenshot from a sample 3D car crash animation created by Kineticorp; visit their website for the video.

Spatial Basics


[Image: Red Bull New York offices by INABA; photo by Greg Irikura]. I got a handful of preview shots from the new Red Bull New York offices the other night, with interiors designed by INABA, and I thought I'd post them here.

"We don't have an algorithm for this"


[Image: Comet 67P, via ESA]. In the story of how European Space Agency researchers are scrambling to locate—and possibly move—the Rosetta probe, which they successfully landed on Comet 67P two days ago, there's an interesting comment about computer vision and the perception of unfamiliar landscapes.

Goldberg Robotics


[Image: From Science Daily/University of Oslo]. Robots emitting robots emitting robots: this is one way that machines will learn to navigate extreme spatial environments.

Amongst the Machines: A Visit to the Tesla Factory


[Image: Outside the Tesla factory; Instagram by BLDGBLOG]. The coolest thing about a tour of the Tesla factory out in Fremont, California, is the huge metal-stamping machine—a behemoth piece of equipment that applies more than five thousand tons of pressure in order to mold metal parts in an instant.

The Future is Accessible by Automobile


[Image: "Fantasy House 10" by Charley Harper]. These aren't the best-quality scans in the world, but I just rediscovered these on my computer and thought I'd post them.

In The Dust Of This Planet


[Image: Photo by Dmitry Kostyukov, courtesy of The New York Times]. The New York Times has the strange story of an abandoned and overgrown military base near Paris where "scientists blew up more than half a ton of uranium in 2,000 explosions...

Touchscreen Landscapes


[Image: Screen grab via military.com]. This new, partly digital sand table interface developed for military planning would seem to have some pretty awesome uses in an architecture or landscape design studio.

Touchscreen Landscapes


[Image: Screen grab via military.com]. This new, partly digital sand table interface developed for military planning exercises would seem to have some pretty awesome uses in an architecture or landscape design studio.

The Civic Minimum


[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke]. Gravesend is a suburb east of London, hosting on its own eastern edge something of a secondary suburb: a mysterious town on the edge of town that turns out not to be a town at all.

The Civic Minimum


[Image: From Gravesend—The Death of Community by Chris Clarke]. Gravesend is a suburb east of London, hosting on its own eastern edge something of a secondary suburb: a mysterious town on the edge of town that turns out not to be a town at all.

A Geography of Devices


[Image: Tokyo subway map, via re:form]. "Just as postal systems remade geographic places into zones determined by politics and history," Amy Johnson writes for re:form, "social media technologies are remaking them today." "Historically," Johnson writes, "the categories of both who helps in natural disasters and who is helped have largely been organized around place, in this case mapped according to its political and geographic dimensions, by government agencies and relief organizations with parallel structures.

We Can Terraform It For You Wholesale


[Image: Real estate development or avant-garde earthwork? The future streets of Ascaya; courtesy of Ascaya].

Landscape, Redacted


[Image: "Looking east over unbuilt Ascaya lots, Black Mountain beyond, Henderson, Nevada," 2010; from Black Mountain by Michael Light].

Landscape, Redacted


[Image: "Looking east over unbuilt Ascaya lots, Black Mountain beyond, Henderson, Nevada," 2010; from Black Mountain by Michael Light].

Atmospheric Crystallography


[Image: From the original research paper (PDF), via Popular Science]. Popular Science reported last week that a "weird crystal"—a "salt made from cobalt"—can "absorb all the oxygen in a room," and, more crucially, release all that oxygen later, at which point it can safely be breathed.

Atmospheric Crystallography


[Image: From the original research paper (PDF), via Popular Science]. Popular Science reported last week that a "weird crystal"—a "salt made from cobalt"—can "absorb all the oxygen in a room," and, more crucially, release all that oxygen later, at which point it can safely be breathed.


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